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Opened in Theaters: Wednesday, February 2nd, 1972

Directed by Stanley Kubrick
Genre: Drama
Running Time: 2:17

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A Clockwork Orange
Academy Award® Nominee
Based on Anthony Burgess's disturbing novel about England in the totalitarian future, Malcolm McDowell portrays Alex, a Beethoven-loving, head-bashing punk who leads his gang of droogs on...  View more >

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Starring Malcolm McDowell, Patrick Magee, Michael Bates...  View more >

Reviews Summary

Rating # %  
See Now!  5 83 See Now! Percent
Good  0 0 Good Percent
Wait for Rental  0 0 Wait Percent
Stay Away!  1 17 Stay Away! Percent
6 Total Reviews

Please Note: Reader Reviews are submitted by the readers of The BigScreen Cinema Guide and represent their own personal opinions regarding this movie, and do not represent the views of The BigScreen Cinema Guide, or any of its associated entities.

[--- See Now! ---]by  Jan 25, 2000
Never has the threat of mental murder been more brutal, more amazingly than Stanley Kubrick's masterpiece "A Clockwork Orange". In this terrific film, Kubrick, a director that has made one unforgettable film after another, paints a picture of hell that is horrifying to watch.

Our protagonist, Alex (Malcolm McDowell), is a cult member whose fascinations include ultraviolence and Beethoven. His life is perplexing, questionable, and terrifying, as we see him walk around in clothes that make him look like he is from an insane asylum, attack people for no reason, and then listen to, at full blast, the works of Ludwig Van.

Alex's life is so gratifying, as we see in a rape scene, yet we never see what motives drive Alex into his feverish terror. That is a Kubrick trademark, however, to let the viewer amass the current situation. After a long haul of Alex's wrong-doings, he is jailed.

Then along comes a government program that claims it can wipe clean the memory of an individual who needs it. Alex volunteers, and what follows is a "program" that clears his memory of not only his savage crimes, but everything else as well: his ability to live in society, to have sex, to make his own decisions. Alex is a lab rat, a soulless being of the state that has no way of choosing between right and wrong, just what the government says.

Based on the novel by Anthony Burgess, "A Clockwork Orange" is one of the best films I have ever seen, a scary, realistic experience, of how a government can be more destructive order than the creeps roaming the jails. It is a fear because this can really happen, a government exercising an Orwellian (or Totalitarian) society upon us. It doesn't stop at Alex the ultraviolence man, why, any person can be drugged and then seduced by the idea, then have their abilities taken away from them.

Partly, this "system" has already taken effect, but not just from the government. Advertisers, Disney, and money have drastically changed both children and adults alike. That's why Burgess' story (as well as George Orwell's "1984", the best book I have ever read), and Kubrick's film, is a wake up call to the world, asking you to be realistic towards yourself, to make your own decisions about others. Not to let the hand of the government better itself over non-government individuals.

Grade: A+

Length: 137 min. Feel free to drop any comments or questions to jwhyte2@hotmail.com

[--- See Now! ---]by  Jan 25, 2000
How does one go about praising a movie that is truly disgusting? It is quite a dilemma. "A Clockwork Orange" is one of those rare movies that really should be seen, but that I would never in my life recommend. The only other movie that has ever left me with such an impression is David Lynch's "Blue Velvet."

"A Clockwork Orange" is, well, how does one describe it? It's the greatest mindbender ever filmed, loaded with imagery that is as unforgettable as anything you'll ever see. I only saw it once, and the movie has stuck with me in such a powerful way, I don't know if I'll ever even NEED to see it again!

Most unforgettable aspects of the movie: the soundtrack, the giant dildo, the imaginative dialogue, and the astounding overall visual presence of the film.

If ever there is any doubt as to who the greatest director of all time may be, all one needs to do is sit in a theater and watch "A Clockwork Orange" and "2001" in the same night, and I don't think there can be any question about it.

[--- Stay Away! ---]by  Jan 25, 2000
This is easily the weirdest movie I've ever seen. The only other one that comes close is THE ROCKY HORROR PICTURE SHOW. That movie was actually entertaining, but CLOCKWORK is weird just for the sake of being weird. I think half the words in the script were made up ("miloka", "droogs", "ultraviolence"?). The story starts with these English guys running around raping women and beating the hell out of beggars. Eventually, the leader is caught and put through a twisted government rehab-torture program. Then, in a twist of irony, he runs into eveyone that he harmed at the beginning. The weird part is that the scenery is way too surreal. I can't really describe it, except to say that it's like a Jackson Polluck painting. I think the most offensive element of this film is the way the lead character, Alex, is portrayed as somewhat of a hero. Excuse me, but a rapist/murderer is not my idea of a hero in ANY respect.

I think that Stanley Kubrick's motivation behind this movie is to be as surreal as possible and make every weird element appear to be completely profound. He feels that, by making a movie with a truckload of messed up stuff, he will appear to be a creative genius with an unsurpassed intellect. That's like watching static on TV and thinking it has some profound meaning to it. Don't fall for this trap. It's a trap that Hollywood has created. When you watch this movie, please consider that maybe there really is nothing more to it than a gibberish script and truly awful art direction. It is meaningless drivel that attempts to pass itself off as 'art'. You want art? Watch SCHINDLER'S LIST or SAVING PRIVATE RYAN. Don't bother with this one unless you're on some type of narcotic. Overall, a truly horrible movie.

RATING: ZERO STARS

[--- See Now! ---]by VIP MemberNov 21, 2001
One of the best films by director Stanley Kubrick. This masterprice is been at the center of dispute for many years. some of the critcs contend that the film is very violent, yes the film is viloent, but it was very well made.

The movie is sometimes a comedy, of times it was a commentary on the human condition. whatever you loved it or hated it, "A Clockwork Orange" stands as one of the classics of cinema.

Malcolm McDowell plays the leader of a gang whose only intent is to is to terrorize citzens with violence. One scene where Malcolm was beating someone to the tune of "Singin' in the Rain" One day, his family had him brain-washed to look more like a normal person.

The film doesn't address violence as a social issue, but what we see of ourselves is the whole idea of the movie was was based on the book by Anthony Burgess. "A Clockwork Orange" may be controversial because of the subject matter, but Kubrick took a risk at a film and he made into a classic.
[--- See Now! ---]by  Nov 24, 2011
[--- See Now! ---]by  Jun 30, 2014

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